VIETNAM

General

Foreign Relations of the United States

U.S. Department of State. Office of the Historian. Gen.ed., John P. Glennon. Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964-1968.

Vol. I. Vietnam, 1964. Eds., Edward C. Keefer and Charles S. Sampson. Washington, DC: GPO, 1992. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v01]

From "Overview": The editors developed five areas for this volume: "1) discussion and formulation of policy in Washington; 2) missions of high-level Johnson administration officials to South Vietnam and their recommendations; 3) planning for military operations .. and the[ir] actual implementation...; 4) the relationship among the U.S. Government, the Khanh government, and opposition elements in South Vietnam; 5) the implementation of policy in South Vietnam."

Vol. II. Vietnam, January-June 1965. Eds., David C. Humphrey, Ronald D. Landa, and Louis J. Smith. Washington, DC: GPO, 1995. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v02]

From "Overview": The editors developed six areas in this volume: "1) formulation of policy in Washington...; 2) the advisory process, including ... intelligence assessments of the situation in Vietnam...; 3) efforts to negotiate a settlement to the Vietnam conflict...; 4) military planning and strategy; 5) the relationship between the United States Government and the South Vietnamese Government...; and 6) the implementation of policy in South Vietnam."

Vol. III. Vietnam, June-December 1965. Eds., David C. Humphrey, Edward C. Keefer, and Louis J. Smith. Washington, DC: GPO, 1995. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v03]

From "Overview": The editors developed six areas in this volume: "1) formulation of policy in Washington...; 2) the advisory process, including ... intelligence assessments of the situation in Vietnam...; 3) efforts to negotiate a settlement to the Vietnam conflict ... and the issue of bombing pauses; 4) military planning and strategy and non-military programs in Vietnam; 5) the relationship between the United States Government and the South Vietnamese Government...; and 6) the implementation of policy in South Vietnam."

Vol. IV. Vietnam, 1966. Ed., David C. Humphrey. Washington, DC: GPO, 1998. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v04]

From "Overview": The following thematic areas are included here: "1) formulation of policy in Washington...; 2) the advisory process, including ... intelligence assessments of the situation in Vietnam...; 3) diplomatic efforts to initiate peace negotiations...; 4) efforts to make contact with officials of the National Liberation Front; 5) military planning and strategy, including pacification; 6) Executive-Congressional relationships in Washington...;.7) the relationship between the U.S. Government and the South Vietnamese Governmen...; 8) the implementation in South Vietnam of major foreign policy decisions."

Vol. V. Vietnam, 1967. Ed., Kent Sieg. Washington, DC: GPO, 2002. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v05]

From "Overview": Major themes include "the U.S. effort to explore a possible negotiated settlement of the war..., the military intensification of the war effort to force the enemy to accept a peace settlement..., [t]he problem of U.S. domestic support for the war..., [and the] effort to encourage reorganization and reform of the South Vietnam Government.... Another focus is the debate within the U.S. intelligence community over the size of the enemy in South Vietnam, the so-called 'order of battle' controversy."

Vol. VI. Vietnam, January-August 1968.. Ed., Kent Sieg. Washington, DC: GPO, 2002. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v06]

From "Overview": "Of primary importance to President Johnson was ... [the] efforts to find a negotiated end to the war.... [D]iplomatic efforts were overshadowed by ... the Tet Offensive and the resulting policy debate in Washington on whether to raise the number of U.S. troops in Vietnam."

Vol. VII. Vietnam, September 1968-January 1969.. Ed., Kent Sieg. Washington, DC: GPO, 2003. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v07]

From "Overview": "This volume is the account of how the Johnson administration achieved the opening of formal four-party peace talks in Paris."

U.S. Department of State. Office of the Historian. Gen. ed., Edward C. Keefer. Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969-1976.

Vol. VI. Vietnam, January 1969–July 1970. Eds., Edward C. Keefer and Carolyn Yee. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1969-76v06]

From "Overview": "This volume covers Vietnam in the context of the larger war that included the conflicts in Laos and Cambodia, and ... also the role of Thailand in Laos.... The focus of the volume later shifts to the issue of the deterioration of the secret war in Laos in March 1970. In March and April 1970,... the volume moves its focus to Cambodia, culminating with the U.S.-South Vietnamese invasion of that country in an effort to attack the North Vietnamese troops in their sanctuaries. The volume concludes with the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Cambodia."

Volume VII. Vietnam, July 1970–January 1972. Eds., David Goldman and Erin Mahan. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1969-76v07]

From "Overview": This volume "documents President Nixon's penchant for secret operations and covert warfare: his continued support for secret bombing campaigns in Cambodia and Laos and his approval of the November 1971 Son Tay raid into North Vietnam to rescue American prisoners of war. Nixon also signed off on new and continuing information gathering initiatives and propaganda that supported intelligence operations against Communist forces, organizations, and governments in South Vietnam, North Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. Additionally, he approved clandestine support for South Vietnamese political entities friendly to the United States. These operations are documented in some detail to demonstrate the role of covert actions in support of overt political and military operations."

Volume VIII. Vietnam, January–October 1972. Ed., John Carland. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1969-76v08]

From "Overview": "The Easter Offensive ... represents the most significant event in Indochina for U.S. policy in this period, and documentary coverage of the event dominates the volume, concentrating mainly on what happened in North and South Vietnam, policy formulation and decision making in Washington, and the negotiations in Paris. Only a very small number of documents relate to events and policy in Laos and Cambodia, and then only as they relate to events and policy in Vietnam."

Volume IX. Vietnam, October 1972–January 1973. Ed., John Carland. [http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1969-76v09]

From "Overview": "In the wake of unproductive December meetings [with the North Vietnamese], Nixon took one of his most controversial decisions: re-mining Haiphong Harbor and ordering an air campaign against the Hanoi-Haiphong complex..... North Vietnam agreed to return to the negotiating table, and [South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van] Thieu agreed to the new terms. In early January 1973, Kissinger and [North Vietnamese representative] Le Duc Tho returned to Paris and in several days of hard bargaining ironed out the last details of the settlement."

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