ESPIONAGE CASES - UNITED STATES

Other Cases - By Name

B

Included here:

1. David H. Barnett

2. Virginia Jean Baynes

3. Felix Bloch

4. Herbert Boeckenhaupt

5. Christopher Boyce and Andrew Lee

6. Joseph Garfield Brown

Materials in each listing presented chronologically.

1. David H. Barnett

David H. Barnett worked for the CIA until 1970, with duty in the Far East and the United States. Strapped for money, he approached Soviet intelligence in 1976 and began selling the names of CIA agents and other information. Arrested in 1980, he was convicted and sentenced to 18 years in prison. Watson, et al, eds., United States Intelligence, p. 36.

2. Virginia Jean Baynes

In 1991, "an internal CIA inquiry determined that [Virginia Jean] Baynes,... assigned ... to the embassy in Manila, had passed two or three classified documents to [Joseph Garfield] Brown. Baynes had met Brown when she enrolled in a karate class which he taught at an embassy annex. According to Baynes, as the friendship between her and Brown grew in the late summer of 1990, he asked her to obtain CIA information on assassinations planned by an insurgent group that were to be carried out in the Philippines. Baynes who held a Top Secret clearance complied with his request by removing secret documents from the embassy.... Baynes pleaded guilty to espionage in federal court on 22 May 1992, and served a 41-month prison term." U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Security Service, Recent Espionage Cases, 1975-1999 at http://www.dss.mil/training/espionage/ [no longer active 1/31/08].

3. Felix Bloch

Felix Bloch, a Foreign Service officer, was accused in 1989 of spying for Russia; he was never charged. Dershowitz' description below is apt.

Mackenzie, Hillary, and John Holland. "A Case of Espionage: The FBI Investigates an American Diplomat." Maclean's, 7 Aug. 1989, 27.

Dershowitz, Alan. "A Curious Case Gets Curiouser." Washington Times, 27 Dec. 1989, F3.

Wise, David. "The Felix Bloch Affair." New York Times Magazine, 13 May 1990, 28-31 ff.

Leppard, David, Jon Ungoed-Thomas, Paul Nuki, Gareth Walsh, and Clive Freeman. "Briton's Treachery Exposed by Keeper of KGB's Secrets: Defector Smuggled Out Copies of the 'Crown Jewels' of Soviet Espionage." Sunday Times (London), 12 Sept. 1999. [http://www.the-times.co.uk]

Vasili Mitrokhin was head archivist of the KGB's First Chief Directorate until he retired in 1985. He regularly removed key files from storage, copied down their contents on pieces of paper, smuggled them past the security guards, took them to his home, and typed up verbatim transcripts of his handwritten notes.

In 1992, "he travelled to Latvia, taking thousands of pages of his documents with him. He walked into the American embassy in Riga and asked if he could defect.... Incredibly, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officers at the embassy were not interested.... The documents he had were clearly not originals and could easily have been fakes....

"Undeterred, Mitrokhin went to the British embassy," where a Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) officer "spotted his potential. After a series of in-depth interviews and consultations with headquarters, Mitrokhin was formally accepted as an MI6 agent.... Within weeks of his defection, MI6 carried out a delicate operation to remove the files [hidden in Mitrokhin's house and garden].... The classified files went back to the 1930s....

"[S]enior intelligence officers say that the files have generated hundreds of new leads and could lead to a spate of new espionage prosecutions.... Some of Mitrokhin's information helped to convict Robert Lipka, a former clerk at the National Security Agency. He had spied for the Russians in the late 1960s but had evaded FBI surveillance until Mitrokhin came in. He is now serving an 18-year sentence.

"Another case that has been reopened is that of Felix Bloch, the highest-ranking State Department official ever investigated for espionage. He was fired in 1989 and stripped of his pension, but the FBI never had enough evidence to charge him."

Macintyre, Ben. "Files Led FBI to Agent at Work in US." Times (London), 13 Sep. 1999. [http://www.the-times.co.uk]

According to former KGB officer Vasili Mitrokhin and Cambridge historian Christopher Andrew, Robert Lipka, a former clerk at the National Security Agency, was captured "through information contained in the 'Mitrokhin files.'" Lipka is "currently serving an 18-year sentence for espionage."

The files "are also believed to contain information ... on the enduring mystery of Felix Bloch.... The State Department alleged he had engaged in 'illegal activities involving agents of a foreign intelligence service', but he was never charged and instead lost his job for lying to the FBI about the incident."

Blythe, Anne. "As Spy Meeting Looms, Suspect Still on Agenda: Ex-Diplomat Lives Quietly in Triangle." News & Observer (Raleigh, NC), 23 Mar. 2009. [http://www.newsobserver.com]

"Felix Bloch, the suspected spy never charged with espionage, [now] lives in relative anonymity, driving a Chapel Hill bus."

4. Herbert Boeckenhaupt

Herbert Boeckenhaupt, an Air Force communications specialist and crypto-repairman stationed at March AFB, California, was arrested in October 1966 for selling classified information to the Soviet GRU. He was tried, convicted, and sentenced to 30 years in prison. Watson, et al, eds., United States Intelligence, p. 47.

5. Christopher Boyce and Andrew Lee

Lindsey, Robert. The Falcon and the Snowman: A True Story of Friendship and Espionage. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979. New York: Pocket Books, 1979. [pb] London: Jonathan Cape, 1980.

6. Joseph Garfield Brown

"JOSEPH GARFIELD BROWN, former US airman [1966-1968] and martial arts instructor, was arrested by FBI agents on 27 December 1992, and charged with spying for the Philippine government. Brown allegedly provided an official there with illegally obtained secret CIA documents.... [On 28 December 1992,] he was indicted on three counts of espionage in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia. Brown ... [was] accused of obtaining classified documents in 1990 and 1991 in Manila from CIA secretary, VIRGINIA JEAN BAYNES, and passing them to a Philippine government official.... Brown pleaded guilty in April 1993 to a charge of conspiring to commit espionage.... He was sentenced to nearly six years in prison." U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Security Service, Recent Espionage Cases, 1975-1999 at http://www.dss.mil/training/espionage/ [no longer active 1/31/08].

Return to Spy Cases - U.S. Table of Contents