AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Arnold & André

Included here:

1. General

2. Benedict Arnold

3. John André

1. General

Ford, Corey. A Peculiar Service: A Narrative of Espionage in and Around New York during the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1965.

Constantinides: This work covers "the cases of Nathan Hale, Major André, and Benedict Arnold and the work of the Culper Ring"; therefore, it is not a complete history of U.S. intelligence during the Revolutionary War.

Van Doren, Carl. Secret History of the American Revolution. Garden City, NY: Garden City Publishing, 1941.

Constantinides: This work focuses on "British and loyalist clandestine and covert actions against the revolutionary cause on the American continent." At the time of its publication it was hailed as a "basic addition to the great books on the American Revolution"; today, it is just as important for its effect of stimulating others to study the role of intelligence in the Revolutionary War.

2. Benedict Arnold

Abbatt, William. The Crisis of the Revolution: Being the Story of Arnold and André; Now for the First Time Collected from all Sources, and Illustrated with Views of All Places Identified With It. New York: William Abbatt, 1899. Fleischmanns, NY: Harbor Hill Books, 1976.

Arnold, Isaac N. The Life of Benedict Arnold: His Patriotism and His Treason. Chicago: Jansen McClurg, 1880. [Petersen]

Boylan, Brian R. Benedict Arnold: The Dark Eagle. New York: Norton, 1973.

Brandt, Clare. The Man in the Mirror: A Life of Benedict Arnold. New York: Random House, 1994.

Surveillant 3.4/5 comments that The Man in the Mirror "reduces too much the role of John André, possibly to keep our focus on Arnold, but little else appears deficient in this crisp, compelling portrait.... Highly recommended."

Decker, Malcolm. Benedict Arnold: Son of the Havens. New York: Antiquarian, 1961.

Flexner, James Thomas. The Traitor and the Spy: Benedict Arnold and John André. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1992. [pb. ed. of 1953 original]

Surveillant 2.2: This is "widely considered one of the best accounts of the traitorous hero."

Martin, James Kirby. Benedict Arnold, Revolutionary Hero: An American Warrior Reconsidered. New York: New York University Press, 1997.

Palmer, Parameters, Autumn 1998, notes that Martin focuses "in depth on Arnold's Patriot years." This allows him "to explore exhaustively that brief period in which Arnold flashed meteor-like from unknown merchant to celebrated hero and then started the downward spiral to despised traitor.... For the person coming the first time to the always fascinating story of a soaring leader who falls from grace, the narrative provides both entertainment and education. Although well written and carefully researched, the book fails in one major way. When the author is all through, Arnold remains an enigma. The reader learns much about what happened, but is left wondering why it happened."

Puleo, Steve. "Benedict Arnold: The Making of a Traitor." American History, Aug. 2001. [http://www.historynet.com/ah/blbenedictarnold/]

"Benedict Arnold's performance at the Battles of Saratoga contributed to the American victory there. But a bitter rivalry with his commander [Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates] helped start Arnold down the road to treason.... Arnold ultimately defected due to perceived grievances he had suffered at the hands of Congress and the military, his mounting debts, corruption charges filed against him by Pennsylvania civil authorities that resulted in Arnold demanding an investigation to clear his name, and his indignation at the French alliance."

Randall, Willard Sterne.

1. Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor. Garden City, NY: Morrow, 1990. 1991. [pb] New York: Barnes & Noble, 2003.

2. "Mrs. Benedict Arnold." MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 4, no. 2 (Winter 1992): 80-89.

"After the Americans reoccupied [Philadelphia], and before she was nineteen, Peggy [Shippen] married Military Governor Benedict Arnold and helped him to plot the boldest treason in American history.... Peggy Shippen was, new research reveals, the highest-paid spy of the American Revolution.... [S]he actively engaged in the Arnold conspiracy at every step."

Stevens, B.F. "A Revolutionary Episode: Major John André, the Spy, and General Benedict Arnold, the Traitor." United Service 3, no. 4 (1903): 1212-1216.

3. John André

Abbatt, William. The Crisis of the Revolution: Being the Story of Arnold and André, now for the First Time Collected from all Sources. . . . New York: W. Abbatt, 1899. [Petersen]

Amory, Robert, Jr. "John Andre: Case Officer." Studies in Intelligence 5, no. 3 (Summer 1961): A1-A15.

A nicely detailed synopsis of Arnold's treachery and André's role as his case officer.

André, John. Major André's Journal. New York: New York Times, 1968.

[André, John, defendant.] Proceedings of a Board of General Officers Held by Order of His Excellency Gen. Washington...Respecting Major John André..., September 29, 1780. Philadelphia: Francis Bailey, 1780. [Petersen]

Flexner, James Thomas. The Traitor and the Spy: Benedict Arnold and John André. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1992. [pb. ed. of 1953 original]

Surveillant 2.2: This is "widely considered one of the best accounts of the traitorous hero."

Hagman, Harlan L. Nathan Hale and John André: Reluctant Heroes of the American Revolution. Interlaken, NY: Empire State Books, 1992.

Lossing, Benson J. The Two Spies: Nathan Hale and John André. New York: Appleton, 1904. [Petersen]

Sargent, Winthrop. The Life and Career of Major John Andre, Adjutant-General of the British Army in America. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1961. New York: William Abbatt, 1902.

Stevens, B.F. "A Revolutionary Episode: Major John André, the Spy, and General Benedict Arnold, the Traitor." United Service 3, no. 4 (1903): 1212-1216.

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