[Graphic from DIA Web site]

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE

Defense Intelligence Agency

Through the 1990s

M - Z

May, Lowell E. "Centralized Requirements in the DIA." Studies in Intelligence 7, no. 4 (Fall 1963): 33-40.

Reviews the functions and activities of the DIA Directorate for Acquisition's Office of Requirements.

McGarvey, Patrick. "DIA: Intelligence to Please." In Readings in American Foreign Policy: A Bureaucratic Perspective, eds. Morton H. Halperin and Arnold Kanter, 318-328. Boston: Little, Brown, 1972.

Mescall, Patrick Neil. "A Creature of Compromise: The Establishment of the DIA." International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 7, no. 3 (Fall 1994): 251-274.

"[I]n the end, the JCS and the armed services won the day. Through sheer persistence they were able to mold the DIA in accordance with their desire: a real edifice built on the solid foundations of the intelligence elements of the military departments."

Minihan, Kenneth A. [LGEN/USAF, DIRNSA]. "The Defense Intelligence Agency: National and Military Intelligence for the 21st Century." American Intelligence Journal 16, no. 2/3 (Autumn-Winter 1995): 31-34.

The former Director/DIA discusses changes in world politics and strategies, the technology revolution, Information Warfare, and DIA structural changes.

Morris, John L. "MASINT." American Intelligence Journal 17, no. 1/2 (1996): 24-27.

Morris is Principal Deputy Director, Central MASINT Office (CMO), Defense Intelligence Agency. MASINT -- Measurement and Signature Intelligence -- "is technically derived intelligence that detects, locates, tracks, identifies, and describes the specific signature of fixed and dynamic target sources." These include "radar, laser, optical, infrared, acoustic, nuclear radiation, and radio frequency, spectroradiometric, and seismic sensing systems as well as gas, liquid, and solid materials sampling and analysis.

Prehmus, Drew. General Sam: A Biography of Lieutenant General Samuel Vaughan Wilson. Hampden-Sydney, VA, Hampden-Sydney College Press. 2012.

Wilson headed the DIA from May 1976 to August 1977. See also, Kenneth J. Campbell, "LTG Samuel V. Wilson, USA: Extraordinary Intelligence Officer," Defense Intelligence Journal 8, no. 2 (1999): 81-94; and "Lt. General Samuel V. Wilson: Extraordinary Intelligence Officer," American Intelligence Journal 19, nos. 3 & 4 (1999-2000): 85-92; and William C. Spracher [COL/USA (Ret.)], "General Sam: LTG S.V. Wilson as Both Warfighter and Intelligence Supporter of the Fight," American Intelligence Journal 27, no. 1 (Fall 2009): 77-82.

Schumeyer, Gerard [COL/USA]. "Medical Intelligence ... Making a Difference." American Intelligence Journal 17, no. 1/2 (1996): 11-15.

Schumeyer is Director, Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center (AFMIC), which functions as a "field production activity within DIA's Directorate for Intelligence Production."

Spracher, William C. [COL/USA (Ret.)]. "General Sam: LTG S.V. Wilson as Both Warfighter and Intelligence Supporter of the Fight." American Intelligence Journal 27, no. 1 (Fall 2009): 77-82.

Wilson headed the DIA from May 1976 to August 1977. See also, Kenneth J. Campbell, "LTG Samuel V. Wilson, USA: Extraordinary Intelligence Officer," Defense Intelligence Journal 8, no. 2 (1999): 81-94; and "Lt. General Samuel V. Wilson: Extraordinary Intelligence Officer," American Intelligence Journal 19, nos. 3 & 4 (1999-2000): 85-92; and Drew Prehmus, General Sam: A Biography of Lieutenant General Samuel Vaughan Wilson (Hampden-Sydney, VA, Hampden-Sydney College Press. 2012).

Waterman, Shaun. "Analysis: Clapper's record at DIA." United Press International, 15 Jan. 2007. [http://www.upi.com]

The man expected to be named as the next undersecretary of defense for intelligence, retired U.S. Air Force Gen. James Clapper, "instituted a controversial and ultimately failed reorganization at the Defense Intelligence Agency when he led it in the 1990's."

More recently, "Clapper left his post as head of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency" in June 2006, "several months earlier than he had wanted, after clashing with [Defense Secretary Donald] Rumsfeld over his support for the idea that the ... Director of National Intelligence ... should have authority over the five major U.S. intelligence agencies inside the Department of Defense....

"Retired Army Col. Pat Lang, who was a senior official at the agency at the time, and left after clashing with Clapper over the reorganization, called it 'disastrous ... extremely destructive.'" Lang added that "Clapper 'had no interest whatsoever in the (agency's) national-level role in developing strategic intelligence for policy-makers.'" Instead, he "organized analysts 'strictly to support the military-technical side of things,' like assessing the capabilities of weapons systems."

Wilson, Thomas R. [VADM/USN] "Defense Intelligence Community Challenges for the 21st Century." Defense Intelligence Journal 8, no. 2 (1999): 7-10.

The DIA Director discusses the "four thrusts" around which the Defense intelligence community will refocus to meet the challenges of the future: (1) database problems, (2) integration and interoperability, (3) the asymmetric threat, and (4) revitalizing and reshaping the workforce.

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