MILITARY INTELLIGENCE

Counterintelligence

A - C

Aftergood, Steven. "A Reorganization of Defense Intelligence." Secrecy News, 30 Jul. 2008. [http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy]

"A new Defense Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Center (DCHC) is being established at the Defense Intelligence Agency to manage, develop and execute DoD counterintelligence and human intelligence activities worldwide. It will take over many of the functions and authorities of the Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA), which drew criticism for its unauthorized domestic surveillance activities.... CIFA will be terminated effective August 3.... The new organization was described in a July 22 memorandum from the Deputy Secretary of Defense," which is available at: http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/dod/dchc.pdf.

Steven Aftergood, "DIA Takes on Offensive Counterintelligence." Secrecy News, 12 Aug. 2008, adds: With the establishment of the DCHC, "the Defense Intelligence Agency now has new authority to engage in offensive counterintelligence operations that seek to thwart foreign intelligence activities."

Transcript of a 5 August 2008 "Media Roundtable about the Establishment of the Defense Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Center" is available at: http://www.fas.org/irp/news/2008/08/dia-dchc.pdf.

Allen, Bobby [CWO2]. "The New Counterintelligence Response to the Cyberthreat." Military Intelligence (Jul.-Sep. 2003): 32-35.

"U.S. counterintelligence (CI) elements must refocus to defend against the rapidly expanding cyberintelligence collection threat.... The greatest threat is from trusted insiders with placement and access to highly sensitive classified information. It is a relatively simple task to plug in a miniature datastorage device and save hundreds of megabytes of classified data they can easily smuggle out."

American Intelligence Journal. "Defense Counterintelligence." 20, nos. 1 & 2 (Winter 2000-2001): Entire issue.

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Armstrong, Richard. "Countering the Third Dimension." Military Intelligence 10, no. 1 (1984): 16-21.

Army Information Digest. Editors. "Army Counterintelligence -- Fact vs. Fiction." 18 (Nov. 1963): 29-31. [Petersen]

Arnold, William R. [COL/USAF (Ret.)] "The AFOSI Counterintelligence Mission: Past, Present, and the Future." American Intelligence Journal 20, nos. 1 & 2 (Winter 2000-2001): 7-19.

The Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) was formed on 1 August 1948. It provides "a full suite of investigative (criminal and fraud) and counterintelligence (CI) support to the Air Force." The author "examines the origins and history [of AFOSI] while focusimg on its CI mission.... The emphasis is on major post-WWII conflicts and [AFOSI's] CI structure today and in the future."

Beans, James D. "Marine Corps Counterintelligence 1990-2000." American Intelligence Journal 10, no. 2 (1989): 47-50.

Beyea, Richard S., Jr. "Security Countermeasures: The 'Prodigal Son' of Counterintelligence." American Intelligence Journal 10, no. 2 (1989): 25- 27.

Buzek, Francis [MAJ/USA]. "Army Counterintelligence 2000." American Intelligence Journal 20, nos. 1 & 2 (Winter 2000-2001): 27-33.

"There are approximately 240 CI personnel authorizations in the Army's 10 Divisions, 230 in its 4 Corps, and 1200 in its strategic units." The three major mission areas are force protection, technology protection, and infrastructure protection.

Carter, Dan. "Marine Corps Counterintelligence in Somalia and Beyond." Defense Intelligence Journal 4, no. 1 (Spring 1995): 83-89.

Coffin, Harold W. Assignment in Military Intelligence. Old Town, ME: Penobscot Press, 1972.

Petersen: "Counterintelligence in the Maine area."

Collins, Richard. "Army Counter-Intelligence Operations." Army Information Digest, Sep. 1964, 8-14. [Petersen]

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