LATIN AMERICA

Other Countries

G - Z

Included here:

1. Guyana (British Guiana)

2. Haiti

3. Panama

4. Paraguay

5. Uruguay

6. Venezuela

 

1. Guyana (British Guiana)

Rabe, Stephen G. U.S. Intervention in British Guiana: A Cold War Story. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

U.S. Department of State. Office of the Historian. Gen. ed., Edward C. Keefer.  Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964-1968. Vol. XXXII. Dominican Republic; Cuba; Haiti; Guyana. Eds., Daniel Lawler and Carolyn Yee. [Available at: http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v32]

From "Overview": "Lyndon B. Johnson made the major foreign policy decisions during his presidency, and the editors sought to document his role as far as possible. In the case of the intervention in the Dominican Republic, Johnson relied heavily upon the recommendations of his key advisers and special envoys... The role of the President and his major foreign policy advisers ... are less pronounced in the other chapters in the volume dealing with Cuba, Haiti, and British Guiana/Guyana."

Weiner, Tim. "Kennedy-C.I.A. Plot Returns to Haunt Clinton." New York Times, 30 Oct. 1994.

When President Clinton prepared to nominate the executive director of the American Institute for Free Labor Development, William C. Doherty, Jr., as Ambassador to Guyana, he discovered that Doherty had been part of the CIA covert action in British Guiana in the early 1960s that replaced Cheddi Jagan with Forbes Burnham. Jagan returned to power in 1992, and derailed Doherty's nomination.

2. Haiti

Click for materials on Operation Uphold Democracy.

U.S. Department of State. Office of the Historian. Gen. ed., Edward C. Keefer.  Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964-1968. Vol. XXXII. Dominican Republic; Cuba; Haiti; Guyana. Eds., Daniel Lawler and Carolyn Yee. [Available at: http://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1964-68v32]

From "Overview": "Lyndon B. Johnson made the major foreign policy decisions during his presidency, and the editors sought to document his role as far as possible. In the case of the intervention in the Dominican Republic, Johnson relied heavily upon the recommendations of his key advisers and special envoys... The role of the President and his major foreign policy advisers ... are less pronounced in the other chapters in the volume dealing with Cuba, Haiti, and British Guiana/Guyana."

3. Panama

Click for materials on Operation Just Cause (1989).

Dinges, John. Our Man in Panama: How General Noreiga Used the U.S. -- and Made Millions in Drugs and Arms. New York: Random House, 1990.

According to Surveillant 1.1, Dinges -- an "award-winning journalist" -- covers "Noriega's rise to power with the help of the U.S. intelligence community."

4. Paraguay

McSherry, J. Patrice.

1. "Operation Condor: Clandestine Inter-American System." Social Justice 26, no. 4 (Winter 1999): 144-175.

This article traces "[a]nti-insurrection collusion among the intelligence services of the 'southern cone' countries of Argentina, Brazil and Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay." Swenson, IJI&C 16.1/127/fn25.

2. Predatory States: Operation Condor and Covert War in Latin America. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005.

From publisher: "Operation Condor was a military network created in the 1970s to eliminate political opponents of Latin American regimes. Its key members were the anticommunist dictatorships of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil, later joined by Peru and Ecuador, with covert support from the U.S. government." The author draws "on a wealth of testimonies, declassified files, and Latin American primary sources." McSherry "shows how ... Operation Condor hunted down, seized, and executed political opponents across borders."

5. Uruguay

McSherry, J. Patrice.

1. "Operation Condor: Clandestine Inter-American System." Social Justice 26, no. 4 (Winter 1999): 144-175.

This article traces "[a]nti-insurrection collusion among the intelligence services of the 'southern cone' countries of Argentina, Brazil and Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay." Swenson, IJI&C 16.1/127/fn25.

2. Predatory States: Operation Condor and Covert War in Latin America. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005.

From publisher: "Operation Condor was a military network created in the 1970s to eliminate political opponents of Latin American regimes. Its key members were the anticommunist dictatorships of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil, later joined by Peru and Ecuador, with covert support from the U.S. government." The author draws "on a wealth of testimonies, declassified files, and Latin American primary sources." McSherry "shows how ... Operation Condor hunted down, seized, and executed political opponents across borders."

6. Venezuela

Nelson, Brian A. The Silence and the Scorpion: The Coup against Chavez and the Making of Modern Venezuela. New York: Nation Books, 2009.

Goulden, Washington Times, 21 Jun. 2009, and Intelligencer 17.2 (Fall 2009), finds it "disheartening to read an account of how a respectable broad-based opposition came within a hair of tossing [Chavez] from office in 2002, only to fail because of awesomely stupid political decisions." The author "dashes Chavez's loud claim that the CIA fomented the popular uprising. The CIA station in Caracas indeed informed Washington of what was brewing -- an accepted intelligence function."

Romero, Simon. "Chávez Decree Tightens Hold on Intelligence." New York Times, 3 Jun. 2008. [http://www.nytimes.com]

Under a new intelligence law, "Venezuela's two main intelligence services, the DISIP secret police and the DIM military intelligence agency, will be replaced with new agencies, the General Intelligence Office and General Counterintelligence Office, under the control" of President Hugo Chávez. The law also "requires people in the country to comply with requests to assist the agencies, secret police or community activist groups loyal to Mr. Chávez. Refusal can result in prison terms of two to four years for most people and four to six years for government employees."

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