CRYPTOGRAPHY

Reference Materials

Topics included here:

1. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

2. National Cryptologic Museum Library

3. Bibliographies

4. Encyclopedias

5. Indices

6. Glossaries

1. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

Pekelney, Richard. "Excellent, Exceptional, Enormous Crypto Source." Cryptologia 29, no. 3 (Jul. 2005): 255256.

"The usefulness of NARA's online catalog varies depending on the age and quality of the finding aids, but it is a place to start: http://www.archives.gov/research_room/arc." There are additional finding aids at the Historic Naval Ships Association Web site: http://www.hnsa.org/doc/nara.

2. National Cryptologic Museum Library

Becker, Eugene. "The National Cryptologic Museum Library." Studies in Intelligence 54, no. 3 (Sep. 2010): 23-26.
"[T]he museum and its library, with the support of the National Cryptologic Museum Foundation, is becoming a world center of historical intelligence research."

The museum's Website is at: http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/museum.

3. Bibliographies

American Mathematical Monthly. Editors. "Bibliography of Cryptography." 50 (May 1943): 345-346. [Petersen]

Bundy, William P. "From the Depths to the Heights." Cryptologia 6, no. 1 (Jan. 1982): 65-74.

Petersen: "Review of several important books on Ultra by an American who served at Bletchley Park."

Galland, Joseph S. An Historical and Analytical Bibliography of the Literature of Cryptology.  Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1945.

Constantinides sees this as "[c]learly intended for the cryptologist.... The annotations are technical and descriptive rather than evaluative.... Nontechnical works are in the minority."

Shulman, David. An Annotated Bibliography of Cryptography. New York: Garland, 1976.

David Kahn, Cryptologia 29.1 (Jan. 2005), calls Shulman "the premier bibliographer of cryptology." Shulman died 30 October 2004. According to Constantinides, "Shulman designed this for libraries, students of cryptography, and book collectors. His comments are for the benefit of students of ciphers.... He was thorough and assiduous in compiling titles.... His evaluations are mostly technical."

 

4. Encyclopedias

Newton, David E. Encyclopedia of Cryptology. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1997.

Kruh, Cryptologia 22.2, declares that this encyclopedia, with over 550 entries, is "a fascinating introduction to the world of cryptology" and "an excellent volume" for the personal libraries of even experienced cryptologists.

van Tilborg, Henk C.A., ed. Encyclopedia of Cryptography and Security. New York: Springer Science+Business Media, 2005.

Kruh, Cryptologia 30.2 (Apr. 2006), says that "[t]his comprehensive encyclopedia provides easy access to information on all aspects of cryptography and security." It is presented in a style that "is expository and tutorial rather than detailed and technical."

Way, Peter. The Encyclopedia of Espionage: Codes and Ciphers. New York: Crown, 1977. London: Aldus, 1977.

Clark comment: This is a basic text dealing with codes, ciphers, and other aspects of cryptology. Constantinides notes that Way "repeats many errors" made earlier by Winterbotham and uses Foote's account, "with all its errors and distortions," to tell the story of the Lucy ring. The pictures are good, however. For Sexton, this is a "well illustrated introduction to the history of cryptography and cryptanalysis."

Wrixon, Fred B. Codes and Ciphers: An A to Z of Covert Communications, from the Clay Tablet to the Microdot. New York: Prentice Hall, 1992.

According to Surveillant 3.1, the entries in this encyclopedia of historic codes and ciphers are not too long yet they are surprisingly detailed. Sexton finds the work to be "[i]nadequately indexed."

 

5. Indices

Cochran, Alexander S., Jr. The Magic Diplomatic Summaries: A Chronological Finding Aid. New York: Garland, 1983.

Sexton notes that this work indexes more than 1,300 Magic documents, and presents a brief summary of each.

6. Glossaries

Shulman, David. A Glossary of Cryptography. New York: 1981. [Petersen]

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