CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

Intelligence Tradecraft

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Hansen, James H. "RX: Intelligence Communications -- Use Acronyms, Allegories, and Metaphors Only as Directed." International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 2, no. 1 (Spring 1988): 21-26.

Hart, John Limond. The CIA's Russians. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2003.

In the "Foreword" (ix), William E. Colby noted that the author brought the approach of a "professional intelligence operator who also is a scholar" to this work. "[H]is depiction comes from many years of involvement in the recruitment, management, and sometimes even psychological counseling of real spies."

Peake, I&NS 19.2, finds that "[d]espite the relatively small sample of cases, Hart combines his experience and access to the case files to reach some first-order conclusions. They are important though not surprising." Seamon, Proceedings 129.8 (Aug. 2003), adds that the author spices his stories "with illuminating insights commendably free from any taint of professional jargon." Jonkers, AFIO WIN 20-03 (27 May 2003), calls this an "[o]utstanding book. Get a feel for what these spies were really like as human beings. Good, useful reading."

Focusing on Hart's handling of Yuri Nosenko and James J. Angleton, Evans, IJI&C 17.3 finds little to please in the book. Evans believes that an "unstated but blatant purpose of the book is to defend Nosenko.... A second, yet by no means secondary underlying purpose ... is to denigrate" Angleton. "Instead of helping the intelligence historian or the current case officer, Hart has transformed the CIA's Cold War operations into mere polemics."

Hubest, Alfred. "Audiosurveillance." Studies in Intelligence 4, no. 3 (Summer 1960): 39-46.

"During the past 10 years there has been a great new surge in the use of audiosurveillance by intelligence services. This phenomenon can be attributed in large part to the development of improved listening, transmitting, and recording devices, new installation tools and techniques, a systematized operational approach to making audio installations, and advances in rapid processing and full exploitation of the take."

Hurley, John A. "A Technique for Coastal Infiltration." Studies in Intelligence 6, no. 3 (Summer 1962): 25-28.

The article describes a "submarine escape procedure applied to clandestine penetration." The method is "buoyant ascent from a submerged submarine." (italics in original) Paul X. Kelley, "Coastal Infiltration and Withdrawal," Studies in Intelligence 7, no.2 (Spring 1963): A13-A17, discusses some of the complications involved in using the buoyant ascent technique for debarking agent personnel from a submerged submarine.

Inquirer. "The Practice of a Prophet." Studies in Intelligence 6, no. 4 (Fall 1962): A29-A41. In Inside CIA's Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal, 1955-1992, ed. H. Bradford Westerfield, 83-92. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995.

The author recounts the story of Ernst Hilding Andersson, who spied for the Soviet Union against his native Sweden from 1949 to 1951. The focus is on tradecraft practices and the capture of Andersson because of "the ineptitude of an ill-trained young case officer sent out from Moscow."

Jenkins, Peter. Surveillance Tradecraft: The Professional's Guide to Covert Surveillance Training. Harrogate, UK: Intel Publishing, 2010.

Peake, Studies 55.1 (Mar. 2011) and Intelligencer 19.1 (Winter-Spring 2012), concludes that "if one wants to learn what is involved in this essential operational technique [of espionage tradecraft], this book is the place to start."

Kelley, Paul X. "Coastal Infiltration and Withdrawal." Studies in Intelligence 7, no.2 (Spring 1963): A13-A17.

The future Marine Corps Commandant discusses some of the complications involved in using the buoyant ascent technique for debarking agent personnel from a submerged submarine. See John A. Hurley, "A Technique for Coastal Infiltration," Studies in Intelligence 6, no. 3 (Summer 1962): 25-28.

Knobelspiesse, A.V. "Captain Stephan Kalman: A Classic Write-In Case." Studies in Intelligence 6, no. 4 (Fall 1962): A1-A13.

Westerfield: "What to do about a 'write-in' who never becomes a 'walk-in?'"

Langton, James. "CIA Fights to Hide Its Invisible Ink." Telegraph (London), 11 Apr. 1999. [http://www.telegraph.co.uk]

"CIA lawyers say that classified First World War documents must not be made public because its spies still use the ink to send secret messages.... The formula is the oldest classified document still banned from public viewing at the National Archives." The judge who heard the freedom of information request in a Washington court in March "agreed, ordering the six files relating to the invisible ink kept secret until 2020."

McCadden, Harvey B. "Cover in Unconventional Operations." Studies in Intelligence 5, no. 3 (Summer 1961): 31-35.

Cover is one "consideration to be weighed in connection with any examination or re-examination of the modus of unconventional operations." It "must be treated as an integral part of the plan for the conduct of any clandestine operation.... [T]he conduct of the operation must be shaped to fit its cover legend."

Mineur, Michael L. "Defense Against Communist Interrogation Organizations." Studies in Intelligence 13, no. 4 (Fall 1969): 49-74.

The advance preparations of endangered agents "are very often decisive in determining the outcome" of any resistance effort. "The agent must be prepared physically, organizationally, and mentally."

Northridge, A. R. "The Selectively Reluctant Informant." Studies in Intelligence 11, no. 3 (Summer 1967): 107-110.

"In debriefing an informant,... one must always take care lest he prove unreliable on some one point, possibly of little significance, for some obscure reason." The author develops an example from his experience with the 14th USAAF in World War II.

Onate, Benjamin F. "Catch-as-Catch-Can Operations." Studies in Intelligence 20, no. 4 (Winter 1976): 27-29. In Inside CIA's Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal, 1955-1992, ed. H. Bradford Westerfield, 93-96. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995.

An account, probably notional, certainly fictionalized, of improvisation in agent handling, with lessons learned.

Ornstein, Jacob. "The Articulation of Babel." Studies in Intelligence 4, no. 4 (Fall 1960): A1-A9.

"Planning is the answer to the language problem of the intelligence service, planning based on a long-term view of predictable requirements."

Orr, Kenneth G. "Training for Overseas Effectiveness: A Survey." Studies in Intelligence 4, no. 4 (Fall 1960): A11-A21.

Reviews non-government programs to prepare Americans for various kinds of service abroad.

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