CANADA

Post-World War II

To 1989

F - I

 

Farson, Stuart.

1. "Criminology: Influences on the Study of Political Policing and Security Intelligence." Conflict Quarterly 12, no. 3 (Summer 1992): 7-29.

2. "Propriety, Efficacy and Balance: A Preliminary Appraisal of Canada's 'New,' 'Improved' Administrative Security Program." In National Security: Surveillance and Accountability in a Democratic Society, eds. Peter Hanks and John D. McComus, 127-155. Cowansville: Les Editions Yvon Blais, 1989.

3. "So You Don’t Like Our Cover Story -- Well, We Have Others: The Development of Canada’s Signals Intelligence Capacity through Administrative Sleight of Hand, 1941-2000.” In (Ab)Using Power: The Canadian Experience, eds. Bob Menzies, Dorothy Chunn, and Susan Boyd, 78-94. Halifax: Fernwood, 2001.

Fidler, Richard. RCMP: The Real Subversives. Toronto: Vanguard, 1978.

Finn, T. D'Arcy. "Domestic Security and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service." In National Security: Surveillance and Accountability in a Democratic Society, eds. Peter Hanks and John D. McComus, Appendix C, 261-269. Cowansville, Quebec: Les Editions Yvon Blais, 1989.

Franks, C.E.S.

1. "Accountability of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service." In National Security: Surveillance and Accountability in a Democratic Society, eds. Peter Hanks and John D. McComus, 19-36. Cowansville, Quebec: Les Editions Yvon Blais, 1989.

2. "The Canadian Parliament and Intelligence and Security Issues." The Indian Journal of Political Science 46, no. 1 (Jan.-Mar. 1985): 49-62.

3. Parliament and Security Matters. Ottawa: Supply and Services Canada, 1980.

4. "Parliamentary Control of Security Activities." McGill Law Journal 19 (1984): 326-339.

5. "Political Control of Security Activities." Queen's Quarterly 91 (Autumn 1984): 566-577.

French, Richard, and Andre Beliveau. The RCMP and the Management of National Security. Montreal: Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1979. Toronto: Butterworth, 1979.

Friedland, Martin L.

1. National Security: The Legal Dimensions. Ottawa: Supply and Services Canada, 1980.

2. "National Security: Some Canadian Legal Perspectives." Israel Yearbook on Human Rights 10 (1980): 257-298.

Gill, Peter.

1. "The Evolution of the Security Intelligence Debate in Canada Since 1976." In Security and Intelligence in a Changing World: New Perspectives for the 1990s, eds. Stuart Farson, David Stafford, and Wesley K. Wark, 75-94. London, Frank Cass, 1991.

2. "Symbolic or Real? The Impact of the Canadian Security Intelligence Review Committee, 1984-88." Intelligence and National Security 4, no. 3 (Jul. 1989): 550-575.

Griffiths, Franklyn. "CSIS and Gorbachev: Canada's Internal Security and Intelligence Requirements in a Time of Transition." In Security and Intelligence in a Changing World: New Perspectives for the 1990s, eds. Stuart Farson, David Stafford, and Wesley Wark, 140-164. London: Frank Cass, 1991.

Hanks, Peter, and John D. McCamus, eds. National Security: Surveillance and Accountability in a Democratic Society. Cowansville, Quebec: Les Editions Yvon Blais, 1989.

Hannant, Larry.

1. "Access to the Inside: An Assessment of 'Canada's Secret Service: A History.'" Intelligence and National Security 8, no. 3 (Jul. 1993): 149-159.

This article is a review/assessment of a 1978 study by two RCMP historians, Carl Betke and Stan Horrall, "Canada's Secret Service: A History, 1964-1966," released under Canada's Access Act. The study is "mostly presented in a straightforward manner, with few efforts made to set out the significance of events.... The fact that this is an internal history makes it particularly valuable... [It] is now dated, and ... was intended only to be an historical outline.... None the less,... it is an admirable start and ... immensely informative."

2. Infernal Machine: Investigating the Loyalty of Canada's Citizens. Toronto & Buffalo, NY: University of Toronto Press, 1995.

Clark comment: This book began life as Hannant's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of British Columbia. Surveillant 4.4/5 finds "[m]uch weeping here, about nothing. Government employment carries with it numerous risks so governments exercise caution in hiring." According to Hoffman, WIR 15.6, Hannant shows that "systematic screening of government employees" began in Canada as early as 1931 under the auspices of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The reviewer finds the work to be "finely balanced" and evenhanded."

3. "Inter-War Security Screening in Britain, the United States and Canada." Intelligence and National Security 6, no. 4 (Oct. 1991): 711-735.

The internal security forces of Canada (RCMP), Britain (MI5), and the United States (FBI) all declined in numbers of personnel from the early 1920s into the 1930s. Nevertheless, these services worked "to broaden the range of their security operations." One of the "important new enterprises they launched in this time" was "systematic security screening of civil servants and even industrial workers."

Hastedt, Glenn P., ed. Controlling Intelligence. London: Frank Cass, 1991.

Hewitt, Steve.

1. "'Information Believed True': RCMP Security Intelligence Activities on Canadian University Campuses and the Controversy Surrounding Them, 1961-1971." Canadian Historical Review 81, no. 2 (2000): 191-228.

2. "Intelligence at the Learneds: The RCMP, the Learneds, and the Canadian Historical Association." Journal of the Canadian Historical Association 8 (1998): 267-286.

3. "Reforming the Canadian Security State: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the 'Key Sectors' Program." Intelligence and National Security 17, no. 4 (Winter 2002): 165-184.

The "Key Sectors" program began in 1967. Its purpose, according to the author who has nothing good to say for the Security Service, "was to re-organize the security approach by focusing investigatory efforts on the extent of subversive infiltration of three main areas of Canadian society: the government...; the media...; and education."

4. Spying 101:  The RCMP’s Secret Activities at Canadian Universities, 1917-1997. Toronto:  University of Toronto Press, 2002.

According to Peake, Studies 47.2 (2003), this work "is predominantly a study of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's involvement on Canadian university campuses for eight decades monitoring radicals and subversive activities inspired by communists and Quebec separatists." The author "finds it hard to accept that any serious subversion or espionage was going on, even in the United States."

Horrall, S.W. "Canada's Security Service: A Brief History." RCMP Quarterly, Summer 1985, 39-49.

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