Patrick D. Weadon

 

Weadon, Patrick D. The Battle of Midway: AF Is Short of Water. Ft. George G. Meade, MD: National Security Agency, Center for Cryptologic History, 2000. [http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/center_crypt_history/publications/battle_midway.shtml]

At Midway, "Yamamoto's worst fears" became "a reality. Due to an impressive mix of leadership, determination and skill on the part of Admiral Nimitz, the officers and men of Station Hypo, and the pilots soldiers, sailors and marines who carried the fight to the enemy, Japan would be on the defensive for the rest of the war."

[WWII/FEPac/Midway]

Weadon, Patrick D. Origins of the Navajo Code Talkers: Cryptologic Brilliance, Linguistic Expertise, Dedication To Duty. Ft. George G. Meade, MD: National Security Agency, Center for Cryptologic History, 2002. [http://www.nsa.gov/about/_files/cryptologic_heritage/publications/wwii/navajo_codetalkers.pdf]

This work outlines the persistence of 50s-something Philip Johnston and the success his vision met with the integration of the Navajo Code Talkers into the Marines' battlefield communications system.

[WWII/U.S./Services/Marines & FEPac/Navajo]

Weadon, Patrick. SIGINT and COMSEC Help Save the Day at Pusan. Ft. George G. Meade, MD: National Security Agency, Center for Cryptologic History, [n.d.]. [http://www.nsa.gov/publications/publi00025.cfm]

The lack of resources made Gen. Walton H. Walker's task of holding the Pusan perimeter difficult, but "information from SIGINT proved to be a great equalizer. From the beginning of the siege, Walker had been provided with ... the exact locations of North Korean positions and detailed information on enemy airfields and general enemy air strength." During the crucial period from the end of August 1950, "Walker continued to frantically shuttle his units from one embattled location to another. Aiding him in this desperate situation were detailed enemy intercepts that provided crucial information on the North Korean Army's capabilities and plans."

[GenPostwar/50s/Korea]

Weadon, Patrick D. SIGSALY Story. Ft. George G. Meade, MD: National Security Agency, Center for Cryptologic History, 2000. [http://www.nsa.gov/publications/publi00020.cfm]

"The device's success in protecting voice communications was due to a new development known as 'pulse code modulation,' the predecessor of such present-day innovations as digital voice, data and video transmission. It also was one of the earliest applications of spread spectrum technology, which was key to its effective operation."

[WWII/Gen]

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