Ps - Puq

 

Psychological Warfare Branch (PWB). Functions of the 5th Army Combat Propaganda Team. U.S. Army, HQ 5th Army, PWB, 1944 [http://www.psywar.org/psywar/reproductions/5ACPTPWB.pdf]

[WWII/PsyWar]

Public Record Office (UK).

Publisher's Weekly. "Publishers, Writers Quit OWI." 17 Apr. 1943, 1576. [Winkler]

[WWII/PsyWar]

Puchalla, Edward F. "Communist Defense Against Aerial Surveillance in Southeast Asia." Studies in Intelligence 14, no. 2 (Fall 1970): 31-78

"[T]he war in Southeast Asia has produced extensive and at times ingenious attempts at deception. Communist forces ... have relied heavily on deception to conceal their activity."

[GenPostwar/D&D; Vietnam/Gen]

Puddington, Arch. Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2000.

Kaiser, Washington Post, 6 Aug. 2000, and WPNWE, 21 Aug. 2000, says that "despite its cheerleading tone," this book "is sufficiently thorough to be useful to anyone interested in the minutiae of American foreign policy in Eastern Europe after World War II." The reviewer for Journal of Cold War Studies 4.1 (Winter 2002) suggests that this work "offers a useful building block for future attempts to assess the role and effectiveness" of RFE and RL during the Cold War.

To Lucas, H-Diplo, H-Net Reviews, Sep. 2000 [http://www.h-net.org], "there is some value in passages on political divisions amongst the staff, concern over the tone of broadcasts, and the problems of locating RFE's European headquarters in Munich." The book also "has some broader insights into the tensions caused by the Reagan Adminstration's more aggressive broadcasting strategy. Apart from this, however, Puddington's only distinction is a gung-ho defence of RFE's troops and their mission."

[CA/Radio]

Pugh, Marshall. Frogman: Commander Crabbe's Story. New York: Scribner, 1956. [Chambers]

See also, Don Hale, The Final Dive (2007); J. Bernard Hutton [pseud., Joseph Heisler], Frogman Spy (1960); Michael G. and Jacqui Welham, Frogman Spy (1990); and Nicholas Elliott, With My Little Eye (1993), pp. 23-27 [cited in Peake, Studies 52.4 (Dec. 2008)].

[UK/Biogs; UK/Postwar/Gen]

Pughe, George A. "The Dust That Isn't There." Studies in Intelligence 2, no. 2 (Spring 1958): 71-74.

Reports on the Air Intelligence Division's efforts to exploit the Soviet Union and its satellites for scientific, technical, and other information.

[OpenSource]

Pugliese, David. Canada's Secret Commandos: The Unauthorized Story of Joint Task Force Two. Ottawa: Esprit de Corps Books, 2002.

From publisher: This book "goes behind the scenes in uncovering the missions, training and inner workings of Canada's version of Delta Force and the SAS. The book reveals the unit's most secretive plans, including details about their current mission to Afghanistan in the war against terrorism."

[Canada/PostCW/00s]

Pugliese, David. "Secrecy Shrouds Canadian Spy History." Ottawa Citizen, 9 Aug. 2010. [http://www.ottawacitizen.com]

An "official history of the Canadian intelligence community ... was finished around 2001 by professor Wesley Wark.... Parts of the history have ... been released through the Access to Information law but Wark says large and crucial chunks of the study have been withheld or severely censored by the government."

[Canada/2010s]

Pugliese, David. Shadow Wars: Special Forces in the New Battle against Terrorism. Ottawa: Esprit de Corps Books, 2003.

From Publisher: From Afghanistan to Iraq, this book "details operations by U.S. Army Green Berets and Delta Force, U.S. Navy SEALs, Air Force and CIA special operations troops, along with Australia's Special Air Service, the British SAS and SBS, Poland's GROM, and Canada's JTF2. Also recounted is the highly-controversial raid by Russia's Alpha Group to rescue hostages held by Chechen terrorists in Moscow in the fall of 2002."

[MI/SpecOps; Terrorism/00s/Gen]

Pujol, Juan, with Nigel West. Garbo. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1985. Garbo: The Personal Story of the Most Successful Double Agent in World War II. New York: Random House, 1986.

According to Wheeler, IJI&C 2.1, this is a "valuable contribution to filling a gap in knowledge about the British MI-5 'Double-Cross System' of World War II.... Pujol, codenamed 'Garbo' by MI-5 and 'Arabel' by the Germans,... becomes the most successful double-agent in the vast Fortitude deception operation, 1943-1945." Although he believes it to be a "valuable source," Sexton cautions that "Chapters 5, 7-10 by West are marred by egregious errors." Campbell, I&NS 2.2, is also critical of West's contribution, specifically of what he sees as extraneous detail and unnecessary mistakes.

See also, Public Record Office, Intro., Mark Seaman, Garbo, The Spy Who Saved D-Day (London: 2000).

[UK/WWII/Services/MI5; WWII/Eur/D-Day & Deception]

Puleo, Steve. "Benedict Arnold: The Making of a Traitor." American History, Aug. 2001. [http://www.historynet.com/ah/blbenedictarnold/]

"Benedict Arnold's performance at the Battles of Saratoga contributed to the American victory there. But a bitter rivalry with his commander [Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates] helped start Arnold down the road to treason.... Arnold ultimately defected due to perceived grievances he had suffered at the hands of Congress and the military, his mounting debts, corruption charges filed against him by Pennsylvania civil authorities that resulted in Arnold demanding an investigation to clear his name, and his indignation at the French alliance."

[RevWar/Arnold]

Pullin, Eric D. "'Money Does Not Make Any Difference to the Opinions That We Hold': India, the CIA, and the Congress for Cultural Freedom, 1951–58." Intelligence and National Security 26, no. 2 & 3 (Apr.-Jun. 2011): 377-398.

From Abstract: "During the 1950s, the United States conducted both overt and covert propaganda activities in India.... [D]omestic opposition composed primarily of members of the Praja Socialist Party worked closely with US-backed groups, in particular the Indian Committee for Cultural Freedom, to generate a political alternative to the ruling Congress party. Although receiving covert money from the Americans, these Indians did not believe that foreign money determined or shaped their opinions. On the other hand, their close association with the Americans undermined their claims to represent a legitimate domestic opposition."

[CA/Asia/India; CIA/50s/Gen; OtherCountries/India] 

Return to P Table of Contents

Return to Alphabetical Table of Contents