Vernon Loeb

C

 

Loeb, Vernon. "Charges Filed in Failed Spy Probe." Washington Post, 18 Apr. 2001, A19. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

The court-appointed military defense attorneys "for Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel M. King filed military charges this week against three Navy attorneys and a Navy spokeswoman for their actions in a failed espionage prosecution brought against King in the fall of 1999."

[SpyCases/U.S./Other]

Loeb, Vernon.

1. "Chat Room Causes Trouble for CIA Employees." Washington Post, 12 Nov. 2000, A10. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

"The CIA is investigating 160 employees and contractors for exchanging 'inappropriate' e-mail and off-color jokes in a secret chat room created within the agency's classified computer network and hidden from management. CIA spokesman Bill Harlow said the willful 'misuse of computers' did not 'involve the compromise of any classified information.'"

2. "CIA Shuts Chat Room, Fires 4, Suspends 10." Washington Post, 1 Dec. 2000, A2. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

On 30 November 2000, the CIA "fired four employees, suspended at least 10 others and revoked the security clearances of nine private contractors for exchanging 'inappropriate' e-mail in computer chat rooms hidden from management. The disciplinary action [was] described as the largest in the agency's history."

For follow-on reportage on the fired employees, see James Risen, "Dismissed for Chat Room, C.I.A. Workers Speak Out," New York Times, 18 May 2001. [http://www.nytimes.com]

[CIA/00s/00]

Loeb, Vernon. "Chinese Spy Methods Limit Bid to Find Truth, Officials Say." Washington Post, 21 Mar. 1999, A24. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

"[S]enior U.S. intelligence and law enforcement officials say they may never solve the mystery of how China learned about miniaturized warheads precisely because the Chinese employ a diffuse and maddeningly patient espionage strategy far different from the Cold War paradigm of moles, agents and payoffs. China's spying, they say, more typically involves cajoling morsels of information out of visiting foreign experts and tasking thousands of Chinese abroad to bring secrets home one at a time like ants carrying grains of sand."

[CIA/90s/99/ChinaFallout]

Loeb, Vernon. "Clinton Taps Analyst as CIA Deputy." Washington Post, 16 Jul. 2000, A10. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

On 13 July 2000, Presdient Clinton forwarded to the Senate his nomination of John E. McLaughlin to be Deputy Director of Central Intelligence (DDCI). McLaughlin has been Deputy Director for Intelligence since 1997 and Acting DDCI since the end of June.

[CIA/00s/00/Gen]

Loeb, Vernon. "Confessions of a Hero." Washington Post, 29 Apr. 2001, F1. [http://www. washingtonpost.com]

While recounting the difficulties Intelligence Star-holder and 13-year CIA veteran Mike Shanklin has had with the polygraph, the article also offers up some interesting tidbits about the CIA's activities in Somalia in the early 1990s.

[CA/Africa/Gen]

Loeb, Vernon. "Congress Stokes Visions of War to Oust Saddam: White House Fears Fiasco in Aid to Rebels." Washington Post, 12 Aug. 1998, A1. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

[CA/Iraq]

Loeb,Vernon. "Could U.S. Harassment of Bin Laden Backfire?" Washington Post, 29 Jul. 1999, A3. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

"Osama bin Laden's global terrorist network has been constantly pressured and repeatedly compromised in the year since the fugitive Saudi multimillionaire allegedly masterminded the deadly truck bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa, according to terrorism experts inside and outside the federal government. But those experts worry that the Clinton administration's focus on bin Laden as the nation's number one terrorist enemy may have raised his profile in the Islamic world and increased the likelihood of attacks by him and his followers."

[Terrorism/90s/99]

Loeb, Vernon. "Critics Questioning NSA Reading Habits: Politicians Ask if Agency Sweeps In Private Data." Washington Post, 13 Nov. 1999, A3. [http://www.washingtonpost.com]

"Members of Congress, the European Parliament and civil liberties groups have begun to ask tough questions about the National Security Agency's interception of foreign telephone calls, faxes and electronic mail."

[NSA/Echelon]

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