James L. Gilbert

Gilbert, James L. The Most Secret War: Army Signals Intelligence in Vietnam. Ft. Belvoir, VA: Military History Office, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, 2003.

Kruh, Cryptologia 28.1, says that this "expertly written text" includes over a hundred photographs of "ASA and other personnel performing their duties, from the routine to the dangerous." For Hanyok, I&NS 19.2, this book "is well put together and illustrated." The reviewer notes that there is "[n]o need to worry about this history being an official gloss. ASA's successes and failures are recounted here." However, the book is hampered by the lack of source notes.

[MI/Army/To90s; Vietnam/Gen]

Gilbert, James L. "U.S. Army COMSEC in World War I." Military Intelligence 14, no. 1 (Jan. 1988): 22-25.

[WWI/U.S.]

Gilbert, James L. World War I and the Origins of U.S. Military Intelligence. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow, 2012.

Terrence Finnegan, Studies 57.1 (Mar. 2013), notes that "military" in the title refers only to Army intelligence, with no mention of the Navy's ONI. Nevertheless, the book "contains much that is new and intriguing." There is, however, "an insufficieny of source notes."

[WWI/U.S.; MI/Army/WWI]

Gilbert, James L., and John Patrick Finnegan, eds. U.S. Army Signal Intelligence in World War II: A Documentary History. Washington, DC: GPO, 1993.

Surveillant 3.2/3: "U.S. Signal Security Agency, Cryptology and Military Intelligence History Sources World War, 1939-1945."

[WWII/Services/Army]

Gilbert, James L., John P. Finnegan, and Ann Bray. In the Shadow of the Sphinx: A History of Counterintelligence. Fort Belvoir: Department of the Army, 2005.

Sulick, Studies 50.4 (2006), concludes that Gilbert's "stories of the prowess and courage of individual agents and his frank assessment of Army counterintelligence flaws, its problematic role in the domestic subversion arena, and difficult evolution into an accepted part of the Army mission all make In the Shadow of the Sphinx a compelling story for historians, intelligence and counterintelligence professionals, and general readers who simply like good spy yarns."

[MI/Army/Overviews; MI/CI]

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