Dih - Diw

Dilanian, Ken.

Dilks, David. "Flashes of Intelligence: The Foreign Office, the SIS and Security before the Second World War." In The Missing Dimension: Governments and Intelligence Communities in the Twentieth Century, eds. Christopher Andrew and David Dilks, 101-125. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1984. London: Macmillan, 1984.

[UK/Interwar/Gen]

Dilks, David, ed. Retreat from Power: Studies in Britain's Foreign Policy of the Twentieth Century. 2 vols. Vol. 1, 1906-1939. Vol. II, After 1939. London: Macmillan, 1981.

[UK/Overviews/Other]

Dillard, Douglas C. [COL/USA (Ret.)] Operation Aviary: Airborne Special Operations -- Korea, 1950-1953. Victoria, Canada: Trafford, 2003.

[GenPostwar/50s/Korea]

Dillin, John. "Congress Quietly Debates Merits of Warrantless 'Spy' Searches." Christian Science Monitor, 31 Aug. 1994, 2.

[Overviews/Legal/Topics]

Dillon, Francis R. "Counterintelligence: One Perspective." American Intelligence Journal 10, no. 2 (1989): 37-42.

[CI/To90s]

Dillon, Sam. Commandos: The CIA and Nicaragua's Contra Rebels. New York: Henry Holt, 1991. 1992. [pb]

According to Surveillant 2.2, Dillon was "part of The Miami Herald's team of reporters who won the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Iran-contra scandal." For Radosh, WPNWE, 13-19 Jan. 1992, this is a "riveting and well-documented book" that exposes the corruption and human rights abuses on both sides in the Contra-Sandinista war. NameBase calls Dillon's book the "best treatment of the CIA in Honduras [?] that we've seen, but it could have been better. Unfortunately, either Dillon or the publisher's lawyers are squeamish about naming some names."

[CIA/80s/Nicaragua]

Dimitrakis, Panagiotis.

Dimitrova, Alexenia. The Iron Fist: Inside the Archives of the Bulgarian Secret Police. London: Artnik, 2005.

According to Peake, Studies 50.2 (2006), this "book tells of uncovering a story of state repression that will surprise no one. What is new here are the details unearthed -- numbers and names -- and Dimitrova's perspective." The author's conclusion "that Bulgaria was not involved" in the attempt on the Pope's life in 1981 "is not surprising." She also "concludes that the first head of the Bulgarian communist government, Georgi Dimitrov, had been poisoned by mercury on the orders of Stalin."

[OtherCountries/Bulgaria]

Dimmer, John P., Jr. "Observations on the Double Agent." Studies in Intelligence 6, no. 1 (Winter 1962): 57-72. In Inside CIA's Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal, 1955-1992, ed. H. Bradford Westerfield, 437-449. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995.

DiNardo, R. L., and Daniel J. Hughes. "Some Cautionary Thoughts on Information Warfare." Airpower Journal 9 (Winter 1995): 69-79.

[GenPostwar/InfoWar]

Dinerstein, Herbert S. The Making of a Missile Crisis. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1976.

For Gilpin, FA (Jul. 1976), the author "proves once again that a fresh approach can draw new and important insights from an already well-examined historical episode." Lambeth, RAND Paper (1976), says "[t]his book illuminates the relationship between Moscow's Cuban policy and the ultimate Soviet missile decision, offers new insights into the timing of the decision, and speculates about possible Soviet internal infighting over strategies once the venture broke into confrontation."

[GenPostwar/60s/MissileCrisis]

Dinges, John. The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism to Three Continents. New York: New Press, 2003.

Maxwell, FA 83 (Jan.-Feb. 2004), believes that this work "includes much new disturbing information and some remarkable revelations, particularly about the relationship of the United States to the Latin American intelligence agencies responsible for Operation Condor assassinations and other systematic human rights violations."

[LA/Gen]

Dinges, John. Our Man in Panama: How General Noreiga Used the U.S. -- and Made Millions in Drugs and Arms. New York: Random House, 1990.

According to Surveillant 1.1, Dinges -- an "award-winning journalist" -- covers "Noriega's rise to power with the help of the U.S. intelligence community."

[LA/Other/Panama]

Dingman, Roger. Deciphering the Rising Sun: Navy and Marine Corps Codebreakers, Translators, and Interpreters in the Pacific War. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2009.

Levine, Proceedings 136.2 (Feb. 2010), notes that the author "describes the development of the 'crash' program for training Navy and Marine Corps Japanese linguists immediately before and during World War II and their impact on postwar U.S.-Japanese relations." Levine, Cryptologia 34.2 (Apr. 2010), adds that this work "is truly a new and unique contribution to the literature of intelligence."

For Goulden, Washington Times (6 Sep. 2009) and Intelligencer 17.2 (Fall 2009), "Dingman demonstrates that an application of energy and talent could resolve our current linguist shortages." Aboul-Enein, NIPQ 26.1 (Jan. 2010), calls this "[a] timely and thought-provoking book on the history of a little studied aspect of U.S. Navy and Marine Corps intelligence." Mercado, Studies 54.2 (Jun. 2010), sees Dingman's history as "a moving and relevant one for today's readers."

[WWII/U.S./Services/Navy]

Dion, Susan.

1. "FBI Surveillance of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, 1945-1963." Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 3 (1991): 1-21.

2. "Pacifism Treated as Subversion: The FBI and the War Resisters League." Peace and Change 9 (1983): 43-59.

[FBI/DomSec/Surveillance]

Dippel, John V. H. "Jumping to the Right Conclusion: The State Department Warning on Operation 'Barbarossa.'" International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 6, no. 2 (Summer 1993): 213-227.

[WWII/Eur/Gen][c]

Dippel, John Van Houten. Two Against Hitler: Stealing the Nazis' Best-Kept Secrets. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1992.

McKale, AHR, Apr. 1993, identifies Sam Woods as a commercial attaché at the U.S. embassy in Berlin and, after 1941, consul general in Zurich. Woods "passed to his government, based on information he received from a Berlin contact, the first accurate intelligence about Operation Barbarossa. He also learned from the same contact about German atomic experiments." That contact was Erwin Respondek, "a German professor of economics and financial consultant ... [who] possessed access to considerable valuable information" in Nazi Germany. For Mapother, FILS 11.4, this is a "valuable" and "well-researched" book.

[WWII/Eur/Ger]

Disinformation. Editors. "Shake-up in Top Soviet Active Measures Personnel." 3 (Summer 1986): 1, 6-7. [Petersen]

[Russia/D&D]

Divine, Robert A.

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