Alfred Cumming

 

Cumming, Alfred. Intelligence Reform at the Department of Energy: Policy Issues and Organizational Alternatives. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 10 Apr. 2006.

In 1999, Congress "established a semi-autonomous agency -- the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) -- to oversee DOE's national-security related programs. Within NNSA, Congress established the Office of Defense Nuclear Counterintelligence to implement [italics in original] NNSA's counterintelligence program. Although DOE's existing Office of Counterintelligence develops CI policies for both agencies, it implements policy only at non-NNSA facilities. Some studies have questioned the effectiveness of a dual office structure in combating foreign espionage and have urged the adoption of an alternative structure."

[OtherAgencies/DOE]

Cumming, Alfred. "Memorandum: Statutory Procedures Under Which Congress Is To Be Informed of U.S. Intelligence Activities, Including Covert Actions." Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, 18 Jan. 2006. Available at: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/intel/m011806.pdf.

See Scott Shane, "Report Questions Legality of Briefings on Surveillance," New York Times, 19 Jan. 2006: A CRS legal analysis "concludes that the Bush administration's limited briefings for Congress" on NSA's "domestic eavesdropping without warrants are 'inconsistent with the law.'" The memorandum "explores the requirement in the National Security Act of 1947 that the committees be kept 'fully and currently informed' of intelligence activities. It notes that the law specifically allows notification of 'covert actions'" to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the House and Senate and of the Intelligence Committees, (the so-called Gang of Eight), "but says the security agency's program does not appear to be a covert action program."

[FBI/DomSec/00s; NSA/00s/06]

Cumming, Alfred. Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Updated 14 Feb. 2007. Available at: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/intel/RL31988.pdf.

On 30 October 2006, DOE "eliminated the use of polygraph testing for screening applicants for employment and incumbent employees without specific cause.... DOE said that instituting a 'specific-cause' standard will significantly reduce the number of individuals who will undergo polygraph testing. This report examines how DOE's new polygraph screening policy has evolved and reviews certain scientific findings with regard to the polygraph's accuracy."

[OtherAgencies/DOE]

Cumming, Alfred. The Position of Director of National Intelligence: Issues for Congress. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 12 Aug. 2004. [Available at: http://www.fas.org/irp/crs/RL32506.pdf]

This report provides an historical overview of efforts to strengthen centralized authority over the U.S. Intelligence Community, as well as a summary of the arguments for and against the various current proposals to create a Director of National Intelligence.

[Reform/00s/04/Debate]

Cumming, Alfred. Sensitive Covert Action Notifications: Oversight Options For Congress. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 6 Apr. 2011. Available at: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/intel/R40691.pdf.

From "Summary": "This report describes the statutory provision authorizing Gang of Eight notifications, reviews the legislative history of the provision, and examines the impact of such notifications on congressional oversight."

[Oversight/10s]

Cumming, Alfred, and Todd Masse. FBI Intelligence Reform Since September 11, 2001: Issues and Options for Congress. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 6 Apr. 2004. Available at http://www.fas.org/irp/crs/RL32336.html.

In response to criticism from the Congressional Joint Inquiry Into the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001, the FBI is "attempting to transform itself into an agency that can prevent terrorist acts, rather than react to them as crimes. The major component of this effort is restructuring and upgrading of its various intelligence support units into a formal and integrated intelligence program, which includes the adoption of new operational practices, and the improvement of its information technology."

[FBI/04; Reform/04]

Cumming, Alfred, and Todd Masse. Intelligence Reform Implementation at the Federal Bureau of Investigation: Issues and Options for Congress. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 16 Aug. 2005. Available at http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/intel/RL33033.pdf.

"This report analyzes the FBI's overall intelligence reform effort, focusing on the implementation of intelligence reform initiatives in the field. Reform policies designed at FBI Headquarters, with field input, may be of marginal utility unless they are fully and effectively implemented across the 56 FBI field offices.... While areas of promise exist, field research indicates that the FBI's ability to formally harness intelligence collection (including systemic accountability mechanisms) to analytically identified intelligence gaps, remains nascent." (Italics in original)

[FBI/05; Reform/05]

Return to Cum-Cur