J. Ransom Clark

Clark, J. Ransom. "Benjamin Weiser, A Secret Life...." Defense Intelligence Journal 16, no. 2 (2007): 155-156.

Review of Benjamin Weiser, A Secret Life: The Polish Officer, His Covert Mission, and the Price He Paid to Serve His Country (New York: Public Affairs, 2004). Click for text of this review.

[CIA/80s/Kuklinski; CIA/Components/Tradecraft]

Clark, J. Ransom.

1. "Central Intelligence Agency." In Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History, Volume Six: Postwar Consensus to Social Unrest, 1946 to 1975, ed. Thomas S. Langston, 78-82. Washington DC: CQ Press, 2010.

2. "CIA and Espionage." In Americans at War: Society, Culture, and the Homefront. Volume 4: 1946-Present, ed. John P. Resch, 26-28. Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale, 2005.

[CIA/Overviews/00s]

Clark, J. Ransom. "Collection and Use of Open Source Intelligence." In NATO Open Source Intelligence Reader, 98-103. Brussels, Belgium: NATO and SACEUR, Feb. 2002. [http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/nato/osint_reader.pdf]

[OpenSource]

Clark, J. Ransom. "Encyclopedic Hits and Misses." International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 11, no. 2 (Summer 1998): 239-242.

Review of first edition of Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen, Spy Book: The Encyclopedia of Espionage (New York: Random House, 1997. London: Greenhill Books, 1997. Rev. ed. 1998. 2d ed. New York: Random House, 2004). Click for text of this review.

[RefMats/Encyclopedias/Gen]

Clark, J. Ransom.

1. "Federal Bureau of Investigation." In Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History, Volume Six: Postwar Consensus to Social Unrest, 1946 to 1975, ed. Thomas S. Langston, 166-170. Washington DC: CQ Press, 2010.

2. "Federal Bureau of Investigation." In Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History, Volume Seven: The Clash of Conservatism and Liberalism, 1976 to Present, ed. Richard M. Valelly, 153-156. Washington DC: CQ Press, 2010.

3. "J. Edgar Hoover." In Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History, Volume Six: Postwar Consensus to Social Unrest, 1946 to 1975, ed. Thomas S. Langston, 199-201. Washington DC: CQ Press, 2010.

[FBI/To90s]

Clark, J. Ransom. Intelligence and National Security: A Reference Handbook. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International Reference, 2007. [http://www.greenwood.com/psi/book_detail.aspx?sku=C9298]

From publisher: "Clark presents a brief history of the creation and development of the intelligence services in the United States. He centers his examination on the two main constants in the American way of gathering, processing, analyzing, and using intelligence -- change and a concern for the impact of secret activities on democratic government. Resolving the ever-growing need for informed decision making continues to put pressure on the country's ability to manage and provide oversight of intelligence. Clark assesses how those forces have resulted in ongoing changes to the intelligence apparatus in the United States. Consistent with other volumes in this series, Clark supplements his narrative with key documents and brief biographies of influential personalities within the intelligence community to further illustrate his conclusions.

"Clark provides a current, explanatory text and reference work that deals with what intelligence is, what it can and cannot do, how it functions, and why it matters within the context of furthering American national security. He describes the U.S. intelligence community prior to WWII, demonstrating that intelligence gathering and espionage have played a key role in national security and warfare since the inception of the Republic. Through their ubiquity, Clark establishes them as a necessary function of government and governmental decision making. Today, the intelligence apparatus encompasses numerous activities and organizations. They are all responsible for different parts of the practice of collecting, processing, analyzing, disseminating, and using intelligence. With the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991, significant stresses began to appear in the U.S. approach to the intelligence process; Clark concludes by chronicling those stresses and the attendant drive for change [both of which] were accelerated after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001."

The Bookwatch, Nov, 2007, says that this work "provides college-level and military collections with an excellent survey and analysis of what intelligence is and how it functions under the umbrella of American national security. From the initial creation of intelligence services and divisions within the US to the ways information is gathered and analyzed, Intelligence and National Security packs in a blend of history and military and social analysis, making it an excellent starting point for any discussion on the topic."

Peake, Studies 52.1 (Mar. 2008) and Intelligencer 16.1 (Spring 2008), finds that the author "has provided a sound basis for assessing the controversies surrounding intelligence today." This work "is a valuable contribution that should be very helpful to those studying or anticipating a future in the profession."

[Overviews/U.S./00s]

Clark, J. Ransom. "New Boxes for Old Tools? Considerations on Reorganizing U.S. Intelligence." The Ohio Journal of Economics and Politics 8, no. 1 (Fall 1993): 1-10.

This article surveys some of the implications of the Boren and McCurdy bills to reorganize the U.S. intelligence community. Click for text of the article.

[Reform][c]

Clark, J. Ransom. "Not So Invisible to History." International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 24, no. 2 (Summer 2011): 383-388.

Review of Allen M. Hornblum, The Invisible Harry Gold: The Man Who Gave the Soviets the Atom Bomb (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2010). Click for the "author's version" of this review.

[SpyCases/U.S./Bomb/Fuchs & Gen]

Clark, J. Ransom. "Report: Post-Cold War International Security Issues." In The North American Nation Project: Year One, 1993-94--Final Reports. Bethany, WV: East Central Colleges, [1995].

The focus here is on developing and running a course on post-Cold War international security issues, with particular attention to Mexico and Central America.

[RefMats/Teaching][c]

Clark, J. Ransom. "Spy Wars: Moles, Mysteries, and Deadly Games," Journal of Cold War Studies 11, no. 2 (Spring 2009): 137-139.

Review of Tennent H. Bagley, Spy Wars: Moles, Mysteries, and Deadly Games (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007). Click for text of this review.

[CIA/60s/Gen; CIA/Angleton/Related]

Return to Clark - A-K